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Trick Or Track Work: Weekend Delays Abound On Metro

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Zombies on the Orange Line will need to add an additional 10 minutes to their shamble time.
James Calder: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jamescalder/1797581548/
Zombies on the Orange Line will need to add an additional 10 minutes to their shamble time.

Metro is making no allowances for Halloween-related fun this weekend — scheduled track work will affect service on four of Metro's five rail lines.

Starting at 10 p.m. tonight, Red Line trains will share a single track between Twinbrook and Grosvenor and then again between Takoma and Forest Glen. Metro says to allow for about 15 minutes of extra travel time.

Meanwhile on the Orange Line, trains will be single tracking between Stadium-Armory and Cheverly, adding about 10 minutes to travel time.

On the Green Line, trains will single track between Greenbelt and College Park. Every other train will originate or end at College Park instead of Greenbelt. Metro says to expect ten minute delays in those areas.

On the Blue Line there's work planned for Saturday only, with trains sharing a single track between Franconia-Springfield and Van Dorn Street, leading to 10 minute delays.

The Metro system will open early on Sunday, at 5 a.m. for the Marine Corps Marathon.

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