WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Majority Of D.C. Residents Support Traffic Cameras

Play associated audio

A poll commissioned by the Washington City Paper and WAMU's The Kojo Nnnamdi Show finds 55 percent of residents surveyed support the continued use of traffic cameras. About half of these people also say they have been caught and ticketed by the cameras.

The poll, which surveyed just over 1,200 voters from Oct. 12 to 14, finds support for traffic cameras across the city.

With the exception of Ward 5, there was majority support for the program in all of the city's wards, including Ward 7, east of the Anacostia River, where 72 percent of those surveyed said they have received a traffic camera fine. The margin of error for the poll is 2.8 percent.

According to city officials, D.C.'s traffic camera program has raked in more than $80 million for the 2012 fiscal year. Critics say the cameras are more about revenue than safety but advocates point to a 43 percent reduction in traffic fatalities this year.

NPR

Nate Parker's Past, His Present, And The Future of 'Birth Of A Nation': Episode 14

News of a 1999 rape case against Nate Parker raises some age-old questions about culture. Can art be separated from its creator? What moral obligations, if any, do the consumers of culture bear?
NPR

Bread Grains: The Last Frontier In The Locavore Movement

Modern bakeries rely on industrial mills for their flour. But a small and growing number of bakers, chefs and pasta makers are making their own flour with the age-old method of stone milling.
WAMU 88.5

Questions About Hillary Clinton’s Newly Uncovered Emails

A federal judge orders a review of nearly fifteen thousand recently discovered Hillary Clinton emails from her time as Secretary of State. A new batch related to the Clinton Foundation was also released. Join us to discuss ongoing questions.

NPR

Instagramming In Black And White? Could Be You're Depressed

Researchers analyzed people's photo galleries on Instagram, then asked about their mental health. People who favored darker, grayer photos and filters were more likely to be depressed.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.