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As Hurricane Sandy Tracks Toward Coast, Residents Scramble For Supplies

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A satellite image of Hurricane Sandy is shown on a computer screen at the National Hurricane Center in Miami on Friday, Oct. 26, 2012. Sandy left 21 people dead as it moved through the Caribbean, following a path that could see it blend with a winter storm and reach the U.S. East Coast as a super-storm next week.
(AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
A satellite image of Hurricane Sandy is shown on a computer screen at the National Hurricane Center in Miami on Friday, Oct. 26, 2012. Sandy left 21 people dead as it moved through the Caribbean, following a path that could see it blend with a winter storm and reach the U.S. East Coast as a super-storm next week.

Coastal Residents on the Delmarva Peninsula are closely watching the projected path of Hurricane Sandy, the storm meteorologists are calling unprecedented and a potential billion dollar storm.

Scientists are starting to get a much clearer picture as to where Sandy will make landfall on the Eastern Seaboard.

The latest tracking map from the National Hurricane Center mirrors the Euro model, which shows Sandy hitting the Delmarva Peninsula head on late Monday night, while the US GFS model predicts Sandy will make landfall on Tuesday near Cape May, NJ.

Either way, coastal residents are bracing for a whopper of a storm. And the fear of losing power for a long period of time has cleared local stores of almost all generators here on the coast, and emergency supplies are already flying off the shelves.

One store owner says she is praying a truck with more generators will arrive later today from Georgia, but she says she was told they aren't promising anything.

Lee Gerachis owns Malibu's surf shop on the Ocean City Boardwalk. Like pretty much everyone else on the coast today, he's not watching the weather channel to look for waves, he's checking to see when he needs to bring a half dozen or so plywood sheets up from the store's basement to batten down the hatches for hurricane sandy's arrival.

Gerachis says his plywood sheets have been through a number of big storms, and he plans to start boarding things up tomorrow, but he admits, the timing of Sandy concerns him.

"I think the fall storms tend to be a little bit more unpredictable, so we could get a lot more weather from it than we are expecting," says Gerachis.

Some locals on the Boardwalk say they think Sandy will be nothing more than a passing storm, like they point out Hurricane Irene was just last year, but many others, like Gerachis, disagree.

"Irene to me was just lucky — it could ve been every bit as bad as it was not," he says.

Folks on the coast are hoping luck is on their side and Sandy heads away from their shore, but it's looking less and less liking as time goes on.

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