Driverless Vehicles Could Appear On D.C. Streets | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Driverless Vehicles Could Appear On D.C. Streets

Play associated audio

California Gov. Edmund G. Brown Jr., front left, rides in a driverless car  to a bill signing at Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012.
(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
California Gov. Edmund G. Brown Jr., front left, rides in a driverless car  to a bill signing at Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012.

The D.C. Council will consider a bill that would allow self-driving cars on the streets of the District, according to the Associated Press. Three states — Nevada, California and Florida — have already authorized driverless cars on their streets. 

Google is developing a fleet of these "autonomous vehicles," and the company expects them to be available commercially within a decade. The D.C. bill was introduced by D.C. Council member Mary Cheh, who took a ride in one of google's vehicles earlier this year. 

Representatives from several companies, including Volvo, are among those schedulded to testify at today's hearing on the driverless cars. 

NPR

Message From Documentary 'Citizenfour': Be Afraid (Of Surveillance)

Ken Turan reviews the documentary Citizenfour from filmmaker Laura Poitras about Edward Snowden and his decision to leak information about the National Security Agency's surveillance activities.
NPR

How 'Foodies' Were Duped Into Thinking McDonald's Was High-End Food

A viral video shows people lauding fare billed as an "organic" fast-food option that was actually McDonald's. It wasn't just pranksters playing tricks on these poor folks, but maybe their brains, too.
NPR

With Biden By His Side, Maine Democrat Mines For Blue-Collar Vote

Embattled Democrat Rep. Rick Nolan, who represents Minnesota's Iron Range, gets a campaign visit from the administration's blue-collar vote whisperer, Joe Biden.
NPR

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

If you call 911 from inside a tall building, emergency responders may have difficulty finding you. Cellphone GPS technology currently doesn't work well indoors — but the FCC hopes to change that.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.