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Armstrong Deletes Tour Titles From Twitter, But Not Other Websites

One day after having his seven Tour de France titles officially taken away and getting banned for life from competitive cycling, Lance Armstrong's getting some media attention for removing a reference to those victories from his Twitter bio.

But as of midday, there haven't yet been changes to his:

-- Facebook account, which still states that he is a "7-time Tour de France winner, full time cancer fighter - LIVESTRONG!"

-- Bio at LanceArmstrong.com, which says that "since he made history in 1999, he has won the tour six more times, and has become one of the most recognizable and admired people of this era."

-- "About" page at Livestrong.org. It says "Lance Armstrong's victories in the 1999–2005 Tours de France are awe-inspiring, but the battle against cancer has just begun."

This raises a question about Armstrong, who is accused of using performance enhancing drugs, pushing teammates to do the same and lying about it all:

Note: That's just a question, not a scientific survey of public opinion.
Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Collards And Canoodling: How Helen Gurley Brown Promoted Premarital Cooking

The legendary Cosmo editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)."
NPR

Collards And Canoodling: How Helen Gurley Brown Promoted Premarital Cooking

The legendary Cosmo editor, subject of two new biographies, knew sex sells – and food brings in ad money. She cannily combined them with features like "After Bed, What? (a light snack for an encore)."
WAMU 88.5

The Legality Of Restoring Virginia Voting Rights

Virginia's governor is bypassing the commonwealth's Supreme Court ruling and restoring felon voting rights individually. Kojo examines Terry McAuliffe's move with a legal expert.

NPR

Sun-Powered Airplane Completes Historic Trip Around The World

"This is not only a first in the history of aviation; it's before all a first in the history of energy," Swiss pilot Bertrand Piccard says. His plane flew more than 26,700 miles without using fuel.

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