WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Obama, Romney Focus On Energy Issues In Virginia

Play associated audio

Both presidential candidates are trying to appeal to voters concerned about U.S. energy prices — an issue that's becoming a centerpiece of the race to win Virginia.

In the most recent presidential debate, both candidates got heated when discussing energy policy. Mitt Romney accused the Obama Administration of hurting the economy in coal country, while the president focused on his attempts to clean up the way dirty coal is burned.

On Friday while speaking at George Mason University in Fairfax, Obama used a new line of attack, claiming Romney has a selective memory, or as he called it, Romnesia, which he used to attack Romney on coal policy.

"If you say that you're a champion of the coal industry, when you were governor you stood in front of a coal plant and said this plant will kill you! You've got some Romnesia," said Obama.

Romney is also ramping up his effort to court voters in coal country. His campaign is trying to use soaring energy prices as a way to galvanize voters. His son Matt will be speaking in Virginia's coal country today, and he has a new ad up attacking the president's energy policy.

NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
WAMU 88.5

America's First Ladies

They walk a tricky line: closest adviser to the President of the United States and hostess in chief. A new book examines the evolution of the role of first lady of the United States.

WAMU 88.5

E-Cigarettes and Vaping

Last week, the D.C. Council voted to designate e-cigarettes and "similar vapor products containing nicotine" as tobacco products. That means that their sales tax will jump from the regular 5.75% sales tax to the 70% tax that's tacked onto sales of products like cigarettes and cigars. We explore what this means for the evolving public health debate surrounding e-cigarettes.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.