How We Watch What We Watch: The Future Of TV | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

How We Watch What We Watch: The Future Of TV

Television, the ever-present babysitter, the companion that asks nothing of you, is changing. It is changing because we're asking questions of it, and making new demands about how we watch TV, and even what we consider to be "TV."

No longer is the prime concern how big your TV should be, or what furniture should point at it. For some, the box isn't even the first place they go when they want to be entertained, for we now truly live in the multi-screen age.

The rise of the smartphone, the tablet computer, Netflix, and other on-demand services has changed the screen/viewer relationship forever. Also, we shouldn't forget the importance of that increasingly antiquated invention called the "Internet."

With each year (and in some cases, each month), the ability to watch things on different platforms at your own convenience moves from the producers' scheduling to the consumers' whims and desires.

To take my own habits as an example, this week I've downloaded two movies to watch, rather than settling for the fare that cable had to offer. I got lost in the rabbit hole that is YouTube, searching for Linda Ronstadt concerts circa 1976. Why network television doesn't rerun those in primetime, I'll never know.

The number of Americans who are now multi-screeners is growing every year. According to Nielsen's television ratings, nearly 36 million people watch video on their phones in the U.S.

TV audiences' habits are changing, and that's why we're examining "How we watch, what we watch" on Morning Edition all this week.

We'll explore where your favorite sports, drama, comedy and music are available — and whether the quality of what you can get away from your TV is actually any good. We'll also look at how TV networks and cable companies are reacting to this changing marketplace and what that means for you, the consumer.

So if you find the ever-growing list of options and choices bewildering, tune in this week and read more here at npr.org. Or in keeping with the theme, catch up later on your computer, smartphone, tablet, video-game console browser, etc.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

How John Safran Lost A Year In Mississippi

God'll Cut You Down is a new book based on the tangled true story about the murder of a white supremacist by a black hustler. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with the book's author, John Safran.
NPR

Need A New Sweet Potato Recipe For Your Thanksgiving Table? Try Gnocchi

Because some cooks like to mix it up for Thanksgiving, we offer a Found Recipe from our archives: Julia Della Croce's purple sweet potato gnocchi.
WAMU 88.5

Marion Barry, Legend Of D.C. Politics, Dies At 78

The former mayor and current Ward 8 council member had visited a hospital earler on Saturday and died around midnight at United Medical Center.

NPR

Car Ride Service Puts Gender In The Driver's Seat

Car share programs are extremely popular, but so are concerns for safety. NPR's Tess Vigeland talks to Stella Mateo, founder of SheRides, which allows passengers to choose the gender of their driver.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.