Historic Virginia Home Sold For Millions | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Historic Virginia Home Sold For Millions

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Two hours south of Washington, near Charlottesville, a 78-acre estate called Ramsay that dates back to 1895, has been sold at auction.

The classic revival style building was built by the Langhorne family, which came to the Commonwealth in 1673. At the time it was built, the new residence was said to have been the largest frame house in Albemarle County: two stories and 5,300-square-feet in the main residence alone. The property was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2005.

In addition to the main house, there's a 2,300-square-foot guest cottage, a two-story farmhouse, a potting shed and a barn. Online sources also note the Virginia Historic Landmark property also features ruins of three greenhouses, a smoke house, a chicken coup, an equipment shed and slave cabins.

The previous owner said it is time for a new chapter for the Blue Ridge Mountains property, offering Ramsay for sale at $7.5 million.

Concierge Auctions says the buyer is from Virginia and the price paid will be made public in 30 days.

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