D.C. Police Investigate Stabbing And Assault Near Two Campuses | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Police Investigate Stabbing And Assault Near Two Campuses

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D.C. police are investigating a stabbing at a Howard University homecoming event and the assault of two Georgetown University students this weekend.

Those two students say the attack occurred when their home on O Street in Georgetown was burglarized Saturday. The unidentified students sustained minor injuries.

The stabbing during this weekend's homecoming at Howard comes as some students have recently expressed concern about safety near the campus after a recent spike in armed robbery and assaults.

It's not known whether the unidentified stabbing victim was a student or had any connection to the school. There's no immediate word on the victim's condition.

Campus police chief Leroy James admits there has been a small rise in crime since September.

One student in an off-campus residence hall was robbed by two gunmen who broke into his room. In another case, a student's car was stolen after men forced her out of the vehicle.

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