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Voter ID Requirements

Virginia state law now requires registered voters to present an approved ID to cast a regular ballot in the Nov. 6 election.  Voter ID laws have not changed in DC or Maryland.

Virginia voters may show any of the following forms of identification:

  • Virginia voter registration card
  • Valid Virginia driver's license
  • Military ID
  • Any Federal, Virginia state or local government-issued ID
  • Employer issued photo ID card
  • Concealed handgun permit
  • Valid student ID issued by any institution of higher education located in the Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Current utility bill, bank statement, government check or paycheck indicating the name and address of the voter
  • Social Security card (not valid for first time voters who registered by mail)

A voter who does not bring an acceptable ID to the polls will be offered a provisional ballot. Additional information on the identification law can be found on the Virginia Board of Elections website.

DC Registered voters do not need to present proof of residency to vote, however some polling places require ID to enter the facility. It is therefore encouraged that voters take some form of identification to their polling place.

District residents wishing to register at the polls must show proof of residence.

Voters asked to present ID but do not have an acceptable form with them will be allowed to vote by special ballot. ID must be presented to the Board within 10 days after the election.

Some first time voters in Maryland will be asked to show ID before voting.  A copy of a current and valid photo ID or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows the voter’s name and address is acceptable.

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