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Polling Places and Times

To find designated polling locations visit the State Board of Elections online Polling Place Finder for:


In the District polling places will be open from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m. On Nov. 6. Due to recent redistricting in D.C., there are new election ward boundaries. These boundaries will be used for the 2012 elections so some voting precincts for DC residents have changed. Though it is possible to cast a special ballot at any location in the District, in order to cast a full ballot on Election Day, a voter must vote at his or her designated polling place.

In Virginia polls will open at 6 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. Any eligible voter standing in line before poll closing hours will be allowed to vote. In Virginia, there is no flexibility on location. Although a different polling place may be more convenient, it is not possible to change voting locations or vote in a different precinct. Virginia law requires voters cast their ballots at the location designated for their residence.

In Maryland polling places will be open from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m. On Nov. 6. During early voting, Maryland voters can vote at any early voting center in the jurisdiction where they live. On Election Day, however, they should report to their assigned polling place.

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