Frequently Asked Questions For Voters In D.C., Maryland, And Virginia | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Frequently Asked Questions For Voters In D.C., Maryland, And Virginia

Can I vote if I have not registered?

DC: residents can register online at: https://www.dcboee.org/voter_info/reg_status/index.asp. D.C. residents can also register at the polls on Election Day by presenting a valid form of identification.

Maryland and Virginia: Residents who did not register by the deadline, Oct. 16 and Oct. 15 respectively, are not eligible to vote in this election.

What will be on my ballot?

Voters in D.C., Maryland, and Virginia can fill out and print a sample ballot at: http://voterguide.wamu.org/.

How do I submit an absentee ballot?

D.C.: The deadline to request an absentee ballot is Oct. 30. The ballot must be postmarked by Nov. 6 and received by Nov. 16 to be counted. You can request an absentee ballot online at: http://www.dcboee.org/voter_info/absentee_ballot/ab_step1.asp.

Maryland: The deadline to request an absentee ballot is Tuesday, Oct. 30. Your request must be received by 8 p.m. if you mail or deliver the application or 11:59 p.m. if you fax or email it. You can access the application at: you can access an application at: http://www.elections.state.md.us/voting/absentee.html.

After the deadline, a Late Application for Absentee Ballot must be completed in person at the board of elections. If you mail your ballot, you must mail it on or before Election Day and it must be received by your local board of elections by 10 a.m. Nov. 16.

Virginia: The request deadline is Nov. 3 and the ballot must be returned by 7 p.m. on Nov. 6. The application can be found at the Virginia State Board of Elections website: http://www.sbe.virginia.gov/AbsenteeVoting.html, or by calling your local voter registration office.

What should I expect at the polling place?

D.C.: On Election Day, you must go to your assigned polling place to cast a regular ballot. If you do not go to your assigned polling place, you will be required to vote by special ballot. Special ballot means that your vote will be counted after your voter eligibility has been confirmed. When you arrive at your polling place, you can vote on either a paper ballot or the touch-screen voting equipment.

If you have a question, problem or concern while voting, the first person to contact is the Precinct Captain. Voters can also call the Board of Elections with questions at (202) 727-2525. To report election misconduct, call the Board's Office of General Counsel at (202) 727-2194.

Maryland: During early voting or on Election Day, you will vote on a touchscreen voting system. With a touchscreen voting system, you touch the screen to make, change, and review selections and cast a ballot.
There will be instructions available at the early voting centers and at your polling place to familiarize you with the ballot. You may ask an election judge to explain how to vote, but you must cast your vote alone, unless you are unable to do so because you have a disability or are unable to read or write the English language.

Virginia: Officials working the polls referred to as Officers of Election will be there to assist voters and to assure that policies and procedures concerning the conduct of elections are followed.
Voting systems vary per locality. A voter may request an Officer of the Election provide in booth instruction on how to use the equipment. The Officer should leave before the voter votes.

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