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Montgomery County Cracks Down On Handicap Parking Abuse

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Montgomery County police have new tools to enforce handicap parking laws.
Ryan Segraves: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryansegraves/3183769172/
Montgomery County police have new tools to enforce handicap parking laws.

Police in Montgomery County have a new tool in cracking down on drivers who illegally use handicap parking spaces.

For the past two months, county police have been able to access the state motor vehicle administration's database to determine whether handicap placards hung in cars parked in handicap spaces are valid.

It's part of a campaign the county launched last year called "Respect the Space," designed to discourage the illegal use of the designated handicap spaces by those who are not entitled to them.

Drivers caught using fraudulent placards can face fines ranging from $70 to $140 and as many as 12 points on their driver's license.

The driver could be fined multiple times for the same incident if their vehicle is not removed from the space in a certain amount of time.

Obtaining a proper handicapped placard can be done through the Maryland MVA website, where guidelines for use of such a placard can also be found.

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