NPR : News

Test Your Food IQ: Do We Need More Farms To Grow Fruits And Veggies For All?

Think you're part of the food-literati? True or false: 13 million more acres of farmland would be required to produce enough fruit and vegetables for the daily diets of all Americans to meet U.S. Department of Agriculture nutrition guidelines.

The official answer is Yes, according to the James Beard Foundation, which put out the quiz. (You can see the whole quiz below). But we reached out to Jason Clay of the World Wildlife Fund who's being honored by the JBF tonight, for a slightly more nuanced response.

For starters, Clay says, it's important to point out that we import about 30 percent of the fresh fruits we consume now. So perhaps we could make up difference by increasing our imports.

But Clay says we can — and should — be smarter about what we do at home with what we already have.

"We could intensify production without expanding into additional farmland. We need to improve productivity in farming by focusing on what matters most. Instead of focusing on increasing tons of product per acre, we could focus on calories and nutrients consumed per acre or per gallon of water," he says.

So, there's really no quick and easy answer.

Here's the whole quiz:

1. Which of the following is not one of the top five commodity crops that receive subsidies through the Farm Bill?
A. Rice
B. Soybeans
C. Cotton
D. Oats

2. Which of the following crops does not qualify as specialty produce according to the Farm Bill?
A. Corn
B. Broccoli
C. Carrots
D. Cauliflower
E. None of the above

3. True or false: Thirteen million more acres of farmland would be required to produce enough fruit and vegetables for the daily diets of all Americans to meet USDA guidelines.
A. True
B. False

4. True or false: The majority of the Farm Bill is designated for agricultural appropriations.
A. True
B. False

5. Roughly how many Americans identify themselves as farmers, according to recent Census data?
A. 2 percent
B. 5 percent
C. 10 percent
D. 20 percent

6. How much of the nation's total land area is controlled by farmers?
A. 10 percent
B. 20 percent
C. 40 percent
D. 60 percent

7. Over the last 25 years, the nation has lost roughly how many acres of farmland to development?
A. 10 million
B. 20 million

8. True or false: Since 1995, 10 percent of all farmers have received 74 percent of all subsidies:
A. True
B. False

9. True or false: Over 60 percent of farmers in the US do not collect subsidy payments:
A. True
B. False

click here for answers

P.S: JBF is hosting foodies and food thinkers today and tomorrow at a conference called "Creating a Better, More Sustainable Food World We Can Trust." (You can watch it all on the live stream.) I was supposed to be there moderating but was felled by a stomach bug, so I'm at home in DC recovering with some chamomile tea.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Lawsuit Will Decide Who Owns 'Star Trek' Language Klingon

Paramount Pictures holds the copyright to Klingon, spoken by some characters in "Star Trek." The Language Creation Society is arguing Klingon is a real language, and is therefore not copyrightable.
NPR

Germany's Beer Purity Law Is 500 Years Old. Is It Past Its Sell-By Date?

For centuries, German law has stipulated that beer can only be made from four ingredients. But as Germany embraces craft beer, some believe the law impedes good brewing.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - April 29, 2016

Kojo reviews Maryland's primary results and what they mean for the region and November's elections. The Supreme Court hears arguments in the case of Virginia's former governor. And a major funder of youth programs in the District is bankrupt.

NPR

Weighing The Good And The Bad Of Autonomous Killer Robots In Battle

It sounds like science fiction, but it's a very real and contentious debate that is making its way through the U.N. Advocates of a ban want all military weapons to be under "meaningful human control."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.