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D.C.'s Chief Tax Appraiser Steps Down

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The D.C. Council is asking for answers about irregularities in the Tax Office that cost the city millions.
Larry Miller: http://www.flickr.com/photos/drmillerlg/1246397248/
The D.C. Council is asking for answers about irregularities in the Tax Office that cost the city millions.

D.C.'s chief tax appraiser Tony George is stepping down. The tax office has been under fire because of a series of settlements that lowered the proposed assessments of hundreds of commercial properties and potentially costing D.C. nearly $50 million in revenue, prompting George's resignation, according to The Washington Post.

Last week, the D.C. Council held a hearing on the ongoing issues involving the tax office which is under control of the Chief Financial Officer Natwar Gandhi. Gandhi denied that there were any improper assessments  and pushed back against claims that his office has not conducted proper oversight.

In 2007, Harriet Walters, a manager in the tax office was caught stealing nearly $50 million through fake property tax refunds. The incident prompted major reforms for the tax office.

The Office of the Chief Financial Officer could not be reached for comment.

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