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'Softball-Sized Eyeball' Washes Up In Florida; Can You I.D. It?

Tell us you can resist clicking on this headline from Florida's Sun Sentinel:

"Huge Eyeball From Unknown Creature Washes Ashore On Florida Beach."

It's big, it's blue and the newspaper says "among the possibilities being discussed are a giant squid, some other large fish or a whale or other large marine mammal."

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has sent the eye off for study.

On the commission's Facebook page, folks are speculating about whales, squid, swordfish, mastodons and Big Foot. What's your best guess (informed or otherwise)?

Update at 6:15 p.m. ET. Some Early Thoughts, Serious And Not-So.

From the comments thread:

-- "Swordfish. Biiig female. Anatomically wrong for giant or colossal squid. Whales have smaller eyes. Randy Jacobson."

-- "My guess would be giant squid. That was what first came to mind. The Raven."

-- "Marty Feldman! Mark D."

From NPR's Facebook page:

-- "Sile Kelleher Eye of a large tortoise."

-- "Jesse Acosta The eye of the Kraken!"

-- "James Nash I have no eye-dea."

From the NPR Tumblr page:

-- "valoscope reblogged this from nprand added: We're gonna need a bigger boat. "

(H/T to NPR.org's Heidi Glenn.)
Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's cute ... but is it too much cultural pressure?
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The Reason Your Feed Became An Echo Chamber — And What To Do About It

It often feels as if social media serves less as a bridge than an echo chamber, with algorithms that feed us information we already know and like. So, how do you break that loop? We ask some experts.

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