Anti-Muslim Ads In Metro Provoke Protests | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Anti-Muslim Ads In Metro Provoke Protests

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Virginia Spatz holds a sign quoting the talmud as she protests the sign placed by the American Freedom Defense Initiative.
Armando Trull
Virginia Spatz holds a sign quoting the talmud as she protests the sign placed by the American Freedom Defense Initiative.

Controversial anti-Islamic ads posted across the country have drawn the ire of many, with some even being arrested for spray-painting over them. The ads were posted in the Metro after a ruling by a federal judge just days ago, and provoking a slightly more mild response from area residents.

The protests at the Takoma Metro station on the Red Line have so far been pretty low-key — a couple of women holding their own, smaller signs next to the controversial ad.

"This is an ad that was put up in New York by the Rabbis for Human Rights of North America," says protester Amy Brookman, explaining her sign. "It quotes Leviticus, the Tora: 'Love your neighbor as yourself. In the choice between love and hate, choose love. Help stop bigotry against our Muslim neighbors.'"

Amy took action because of the controversial sign posted at four Metro stops by the American Freedom Defense Initiative. That sign says, 'In any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man. Support Israel. Defeat jihad." They are posted at the Glenmont, Takoma, U Street/Cardozo and Georgia Ave/Petworth Metro stations.

Metro did not want to post these ads, but was forced to do so by a federal judge. Metro says it will now monitor the ads to make sure they are not defaced or vandalized.

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