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Judge Places Kwame Brown Under Curfew

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Kwame Brown resigned earlier this year after pleading guilty to bank fraud.
Patrick Madden
Kwame Brown resigned earlier this year after pleading guilty to bank fraud.

Former D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown has been placed under curfew and ordered to make weekly visits with court officials, after failing to make three required weekly phone calls with pre-trial services.

Brown, who pleaded guilty to bank fraud earlier this year, is scheduled to be sentenced next month after pleading guilty earlier this year to lying on bank loan applications and a misdemeanor campaign finance violation. He faces up to six months of jail time, and is cooperating with prosecutors in ongoing investigations in hopes of avoiding prison time.

Federal judge Richard Leon issued a stern warning Tuesday to Brown to abide by the new conditions of his release. The former council chair is supposed to check in with authorities once a week and, with the exception of pre-approved trips, not travel outside the D.C. area.

When he appeared before Judge Richard Leon on Tuesday, he tried to apologize. Judge Leon quickly cut him off, however, saying that instead of three strikes, there will be only one, and he does not want to know what it is.

The judge further told Brown that he's not putting himself in the best position ahead of his sentencing and warned him not to "tempt fate."

Brown will now have a curfew and will have to check in with pre-trial services in pereson once a week.

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