Research Points To Benefits In Uranium Mining For Virginia County | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Research Points To Benefits In Uranium Mining For Virginia County

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Researchers at George Mason University say Pittsylvania County in Virginia would benefit economically from a proposed uranium mining operation.

The analysis revealed potential tax revenues, costs, and business activity generated through 1,000 new jobs, suppliers, and consumer spending. Lead researcher Dr. Stephen Fuller says if the mining is safe, the benefits would include annual tax revenues of $1.3 million.

He also says $24 million in economic activity would show up in grocery store sales, housing, maintenance, gas purchases, and grocery sales. "You know, things that you and I spend our payroll on."

But Erica Gray, with the Alliance for Progressive Values, is concerned about the possible effects on local farming, citing radioactive contamination from rubble once it's brought up out of the ground.

"We get way too much rain here for them to actually be able to maintain that," says Gray.

Lawmakers will consider lifting the ban in January.

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