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Research Points To Benefits In Uranium Mining For Virginia County

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Researchers at George Mason University say Pittsylvania County in Virginia would benefit economically from a proposed uranium mining operation.

The analysis revealed potential tax revenues, costs, and business activity generated through 1,000 new jobs, suppliers, and consumer spending. Lead researcher Dr. Stephen Fuller says if the mining is safe, the benefits would include annual tax revenues of $1.3 million.

He also says $24 million in economic activity would show up in grocery store sales, housing, maintenance, gas purchases, and grocery sales. "You know, things that you and I spend our payroll on."

But Erica Gray, with the Alliance for Progressive Values, is concerned about the possible effects on local farming, citing radioactive contamination from rubble once it's brought up out of the ground.

"We get way too much rain here for them to actually be able to maintain that," says Gray.

Lawmakers will consider lifting the ban in January.

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Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.

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'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries — with culturally specific adaptations. The U.S., for instance, gets shorter noodles, because Americans don't slurp them up like the Japanese.
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Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

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Scientists To Bid A Bittersweet Farewell To Rosetta, The Comet Chaser

To cap its 12-year scientific voyage, the Rosetta spacecraft will take a final plunge Friday. Scientists will signal Rosetta to crash into the surface of a comet — and gather data all the way down.

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