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Obama And Romney Focus On Virginia

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Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama talks after the first presidential debate at the University of Denver, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, in Denver.
AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall
Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama talks after the first presidential debate at the University of Denver, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, in Denver.

While both presidential candidates took advantage of their trip to Colorado to court voters in western states, they also never took their eyes off independent voters in Virginia. That might be most evident in former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's comments on U.S. energy policy.

"By the way, I like coal. I'm going to make sure we continue to burn clean coal. People in the coal industry feel like it's getting crushed by your policies," said Romney during the Wednesday night's debate.

Romney will be bringing that message to Virginia's western coal fields at the end of this week. While he makes his pitch there, Obama will continue his effort to energize college students that proved a crucial voting block in his 2008 victory.

To wrap up the week, Obama will be speaking at George Mason University in Fairfax, where he'll likely tout the reforms to student loans he brought up in the debate.

"What we've been able to do is provide millions more students assistance," said Obama. "Lower, or keep low, interest rates on student loans. And this is an example of where our priorities make a difference."

As the race heats up one thing is clear: neither campaign is taking Virginia voters for granted.

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