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Maryland, Virginia Medical Facilities Respond To Meningitis Outbreak

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Several Maryland and Virginia medical facilities are contacting hundreds of patients who may have received injections of a tainted drug that has sickened 31 people in five states.

Seven clinics in Maryland and two in southwest Virginia issued steroid injections that may contain a fungus that causes meningitis. So far, one person has died in Maryland and another in Virginia. Between the two states, there have been six reported cases.

Dr. David Trump with the Virginia Department of Health expects that number to rise.

"We expect that as we continue with the contact information, we may hear about other individuals who are ill and expect the numbers in Virginia and across the nation to change in the next several days to several weeks," says Trump.

The government is warning doctors and hospitals not to use any product from New England Compounding Center in Massachusetts, the specialty pharmacy that made the steroid suspected in the meningitis outbreak.

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