WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

League Of Women Voters Recalls Suffrage Fight In Virginia

Play associated audio

The Library of Virginia and League of Women Voters are hoping some historic context will awaken the state's voters, specifically female voters. 

The right to vote for women was especially hard fought. Women had no rights to property ownership or business decisions unless they were widowed, as during a lecture on the Women's Suffrage Movement, Librarian of Virginia Dr. Sandra Treadway described in a lecture sponsored by the two groups.

The best way to change that was through the right to vote, but they were opposed by political leaders and many others. Those women who fought for their rights were arrested and became public outcasts. 

"But they and those interested in women's rights were very disappointed when the 15th Amendment guaranteed that the rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied on the count of race, color, or previous condition of servitude," Treadway said. "It failed to mention voting rights for women."

But Virginia women continued to organize and push for the right to vote and by 1920, the 19th amendment was the law of the land. 

WAMU 88.5

Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.

NPR

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries around the world and even considered popular currency in American prisons.
WAMU 88.5

Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

NPR

Scientists To Bid A Bittersweet Farewell To Rosetta, The Comet Chaser

To cap its 12-year scientific voyage, the Rosetta spacecraft will take a final plunge Friday. Scientists will signal Rosetta to crash into the surface of a comet — and gather data all the way down.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.