NPR : News

Go To Jail For A Retweet? Filipino Lawmaker Tries To Ease Concern

This headline at Global Post is an eye-opener:

"Philippines: Click 'like,' go to prison. Cybercrime law threatens 12 years behind bars for 'liking' or re-Tweeting libel."

As Bloomberg News has reported, the country's new "Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 ... identifies, prevents and punishes Internet-based crimes such as hacking, identity theft and spamming." Global Post says that one clause "could conceivably help lock up Internet users for 10-plus years over a Facebook 'like' or a 're-Tweet' on Twitter" if the message is libelous.

But The Philippines' ABS-CBN News reports that today, one of the law's authors, Sen. Edgardo Angara, said "the anxiety and apprehension over this are exaggerated." Also, "Angara said at a news forum ... that a complainant must prove first that there's a conspiracy among the author of the libelous post and those who liked or shared it to destroy his or her reputation."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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