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Eating Maryland Seafood Could Help Restore The Bay

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Thousands of baby oysters are reintroduced to the Chesapeake Bay, to boost their population and help clean the water.
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Thousands of baby oysters are reintroduced to the Chesapeake Bay, to boost their population and help clean the water.

Maryland's Department of Natural Resources is sponsoring an effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay by encouraging people to order Maryland seafood while eating out.

The second "From the Bay, For the Bay" promotion gets underway this weekend, but state officials will be launching the effort today at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, where they'll also give a progress report on oyster restoration in the Bay, according to the Associated Press.

Proceeds from the week-long promotion will help the Oyster Recovery Partnership, a nonprofit group that's planted hundreds of millions of oysters in the bay, where the filter feeders help improve water quality. Participating restaurants are donating $1 for every Maryland seafood dinner that's sold during the week.

Some restaurants in Northern Virginia and in the District are taking part as well, along with many in Maryland and at least one in Pennsylvania.

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