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American University On Alert After Four Fondling Complaints In A Week

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The women all reported being attacked on the 4200 block of Massachusetts Ave. NW, near Ward Circle.
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The women all reported being attacked on the 4200 block of Massachusetts Ave. NW, near Ward Circle.

Police are investigating several sexual assaults near the American University campus in Northwest D.C.

American University says four of its female students have been fondled while walking near the campus in the last week. The university issued a campus-wide alert about the attacks on Monday.

School officials say those attacks have all occurred since Sept. 24, and were all reported to university public safety officials on Monday. The women told authorities that they were approached from behind between the late evening and early morning hours while walking along the 4200 block of Massachusetts Ave.

The suspect is described by safety officials as a white man in a hooded sweatshirt between the ages of 20 to 30 and between 5'7 and 5'10.

School officials say the area is often traveled by students, but is off-campus.

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