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Bombing Kills At Least 14 In Afghanistan, Including Three NATO Troops

Some of the latest news from Afghanistan, including a grim milestone:

-- "A suicide bombing [today] in the eastern Afghan city of Khost has killed at least 14 people, three of them Nato soldiers, officials say." (BBC News)

-- "Two Americans were killed in Afghanistan [Sunday] during an exchange of fire between NATO-led forces and the Afghan army that may have been the result of a misunderstanding, as the death toll of U.S. military and civilian personnel passed 2,000." (The Guardian)

According to NATO commanders with the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, today's suicide bombing killed "three ISAF service members and an ISAF-contracted interpreter." The Washington Post is reporting from Kabul that among the others killed were four Afghan police officers. Civilians are said to have been among the other fatalities and those who were wounded.

Reuters puts the number of injured at 37. It also writes that a witness said the suicide bomber was wearing a police uniform when he approached on a motorcycle. "The Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility," Reuters adds, "although Afghan insurgents are quick to claim any successful attack on foreign troops as their own."

Sunday's deadly exchange of fire between NATO and Afghan troops may have begun, the Guardian reports, "when an Afghan National Army member opened fire on American troops." But coalition officers are also investigating whether "nearby insurgent gunfire may have led to a misunderstanding" the Guardian says.

Three Afghan solders were killed in that firefight, according to Voice of America.

Two weeks ago, NATO announced it was suspending some joint operations with Afghan forces in a bid to reduce the so-called green-on-blue attacks that have led to the deaths of more than 50 coalition troops this year.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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