Berliner Likens Potential Pepco Strike To NFL's Replacement Refs | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Berliner Likens Potential Pepco Strike To NFL's Replacement Refs

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It's been almost a week since Pepco's union workers rejected what the utility called its last contract offer, and so far, there's been no strike. One of the utility's biggest critics says he hopes it stays that way.

Montgomery County Council president Roger Berliner says nothing good will come of the union going on strike and Pepco being forced to hire replacement workers. Berliner has been one of Pepco's biggest critics since 2010, when severe weather caused lengthy power outages. He and some fellow council members have even sought legal opinions about whether Montgomery County could start its own public utility to replace Pepco.

In this instance, he says he's not taking sides.

"I certainly hope that we don't get to a place where we're talking about management serving as replacement lineman," says Berliner. "Our nation has seen what happens when we use replacement officials. Those of us that care about football (know)... replacement officials are not a good thing. And replacement lineman would not be a good thing."

After the union rejected the contract offer, a Pepco spokeswoman said the utility will keep negotiating, hoping to avoid a strike.

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