Ocean City Extends Ad Agency And Rodney The Lifeguard Contract | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Ocean City Extends Ad Agency And Rodney The Lifeguard Contract

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Rodney the Lifeguard might be known for saving average folks from boredom and taking them to Ocean City for a much-needed vacation, but the mascot needed a bit of rescuing himself this week by the Ocean City Council.

The contract the town had with MGH advertising, the Baltimore based agency who created Rodney several summers ago, is set to expire and there had been much speculation that the majority of the council wanted to cut ties with MGH and the Rodney campaign and go another direction entirely.

But the council seemingly flip-flopped on that idea, responding to a request from the local Tourism Advisory Board to stick with MGH and table their search for a new ad agency and mascot for at least one more year.

The Rodney campaign has been credited with expanding Ocean City's presence and drawing in New York and New Jersey, as well as helping drive record numbers of bookings and traffic to the resort's official website.

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