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Construction Employment Up In D.C.

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Building, road and other projects have boosted construction employment in Washington, D.C. 14 percent since last year, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

Ken Simonson is chief economist for the trade association. He says there are more construction jobs now than before the economic crisis began.

"From November 2008 to February 2010, D.C. lost 3,600 construction jobs, so a very steep downturn," he says. "But the figured we released is the highest since 1990."

While construction jobs are up in D.C., other parts of the region are seeing a drop.

"The Bethesda-Fredrick market was down, the Northern Virginia market was down and the Prince George's-Calvert-Charles County market also down," he says. "Each a 1 to 3 percent decline. But D.C. added enough jobs that the entire metro area had a positive change."

Simonson says many metro areas are seeing declines in construction jobs because of cuts in public spending for development projects.

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