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American Muslim Organization Hosts National Walkathon

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The oldest American Muslim organization is hosting one of the largest interstate walkathons in Centreville Sunday. Thousands are expected turn out nationwide to raise over half a million for charity and fight "Islamophobia."

This is the first year the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Organization will host their annual Walk for Humanity on a national scale.

"The idea is to raise funds for various charities that would go on to help eradicate hunger, fight disease, and supply clean water in areas that don't have access to it," says Kashif Chaudhry, a spokesperson for the group.

He says proceeds will be donated to organizations helping people regardless of their religion or ethnicity. He hopes the effort will help change the recent dialogue about Islam and Muslims both at home and abroad.

"Here we are, walking for a human cause, walking to raise money for the poor, for the hungry in America," he says. "That doesn't only show that we're loyal to the country, but what it shows is that we have a lot of good things to do."

The Mid-Atlantic walkathon will take place Sunday at 1p.m. at Bull Run Park in Centreville, Va.

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