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Blue Line Escapes Weekend Track Work

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Delays and single tracking abound on the Metro this weekend.
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Delays and single tracking abound on the Metro this weekend.

Scheduled track work will cause delays this weekend around the Metro system, starting at 10 p.m. Friday night and excluding only the Blue Line.

Buses will replace Green Line trains between Southern Ave. and Branch Ave., as crews install fiber optic cables along the tracks. Three stations will be closed all weekend, they are Branch Avenue, Suitland, and Naylor Road. A shuttle bus will connect to those stations, but Metro says it could take up to 40 minutes longer than normal.

Buses will also replace trains on the Orange Line between Vienna and East Falls Church for testing related to the Silver Line extension. Shuttle buses will cause delays of 15 to 40 minutes for passengers headed to West Falls Church, Dunn Loring, or Vienna.

Meanwhile, Red Line trains will be sharing a single track between NoMa-Gallaudet and Fort Totten. Metro recommends using the Green Line between Fort Totten and Gallery Place for riders on the east end of the line.

And on the Yellow Line, trains will be single tracking between Huntington and Braddock Road.

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