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Rider Input Sought On Next 30 Years Of Metro

Momentum: The Next Generation of Metro launched

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Metro is asking customers how the transit service of tomorrow will resemble or differ from the one of today.
Evan Leeson: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ecstaticist/6332860492/
Metro is asking customers how the transit service of tomorrow will resemble or differ from the one of today.

With the Washington area's population growing, Metro is seeking public input on how best to plan for the next 30 years.

The transit organization is asking riders to turn to the web for their survey, titled "Momentum: The Next Generation of Metro." They're asking customers to provide input that will guide decisions on new stations, bus routes, rail cars and extra connections between existing routes. They're even asking how to better communicate with customers and maintain fiscal stability.

The push recognizes that the National Capital region continues to grow faster than the national average in terms of population and density, and the transit system must keep pace. Metro estimates that by 2040, the area's population will increase by 30 percent or about 7.25 million.

Metro also surveyed riders earlier this year on how they thought the transit organization should prioritize the budget.

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