Maryland PRC Reconsidering Storm Outage Charges | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Maryland PRC Reconsidering Storm Outage Charges

Play associated audio

After a summer of severe storms that caused widespread outages, Maryland's Public Service Commission is reconsidering a policy that allows utility companies to continue to bill customers, even though the power is out.

"Like salt in an open wound." That's how customers described the proposal to one Public Service commissioner, after utility companies continued to bill for service after summer storms knocked out the power for days.

Maryland laws allow utility companies to charge customers for revenues lost during the first 24 hours of an outage. Utilities had previously been allowed to charge customers throughout extended outages, but that was revised in January to allow it only during the first 24 hours.

BG&E and Pepco officials told the commission that the charges help them pay for costs associated with power restoration efforts.

The Public Service Commissioners questioned whether the policy should continue, particularly when some customers had significant extra charges after a Derecho storm knocked out power for more than a week in June.

NPR

For More Local Turkeys To Hit Holiday Tables, You Need An Abattoir

Demand for locally raised birds is growing faster than small farms can keep pace with. One New England farmer is making a bold move to get more gobblers to the table.
NPR

For More Local Turkeys To Hit Holiday Tables, You Need An Abattoir

Demand for locally raised birds is growing faster than small farms can keep pace with. One New England farmer is making a bold move to get more gobblers to the table.
NPR

Obama: 'No Sympathy' For Those Destroying Ferguson

Saying he understands the frustrations of people who feel they're not treated fairly under the law, President Obama also said, "I have no sympathy at all for destroying your own communities."
NPR

Is Digital Learning More Cost-Effective? Maybe Not

Digital learning initiatives are spreading to schools across the country, but new research raises doubts about how well they work.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.