Red Food, Blue Food: Edible Polls Give Obama The Edge, For Now | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Red Food, Blue Food: Edible Polls Give Obama The Edge, For Now

Wanna cast your vote early? In Washington, D.C., and around the nation, food and drink have become a popular proxy for voter polls. Though they're unlikely to be accurate predictors, the results of a few seem to be drifting in the same direction as the presidential election polls conducted by professional pollsters at the moment.

Let's start with cheese. While it doesn't have a deep history of political symbolism, it may get a little more attention this year as GOP VP pick and Wisconsinite Paul Ryan told supporters last month that his "veins bleed with cheese."

At the Park Hyatt in D.C., cheese specialist Lisa Hviding is inviting visitors to choose between blue cheese and red cheese. Options for Democrats: a blue cheese called Ewe's Blue and a cow's milk cheese from Lazy Lady Farm in Vermont named Barick Obama. (It's aged four to six weeks and has a "soft elastic body," according to the farm's website.)

And for Romney supporters: Red Hawk, procured from Cowgirl Creamery, a washed rind cheese that has a reddish-orange tint to its rind.

So, who's ahead? "Ewe's Blue might be the most popular at this point," says Hviding. Lest we take this too seriously, she says, so far, most guests seem to be choosing on the basis of their taste buds, not necessarily their politics.

The Donkey and the Elephant are also turning up as part of cocktail polls. At Lincoln, a restaurant in D.C., bartenders are keeping score on a blackboard.

GOP-leaning customers can choose The Elephant, which is made with rhubarb-infused whiskey, homemade strawberry liquor, lime juice and bitters.

And Democrats? The Donkey: A blackberry-infused gin with ginger syrup, lime juice and soda. A cocktail will set you back $11. So far, the "Blue District" of D.C. is choosing Donkeys, which lead Elephants 41 to 36.

As our colleague Linton Weeks has reported, the 7-Eleven Coffee Cup challenge is yet another opportunity for customers to signal their pick for prez.

Though the brew is the same regardless of your politics, customers can pick a red or blue paper to-go cup.

At last check, Obama leads Romney, 58 percent to 42 percent across the country. And when you break it down by states, there are even bigger spreads. In Washington, D.C., Obama's up 76 percent to Romney's 24 percent.

Romney does hold the lead among 7-Eleven coffee drinkers in three states that may lean to the right in the upcoming presidential election: West Virginia, Idaho and New Hampshire.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Searching For Buried Treasure In China, A Writer Discovers Himself

During the Sino-Japanese War, Huan Hsu's great-great-grandfather buried his vast porcelain collection to keep it safe. Hsu went to find it 70 years later, on a trip about more than missing china.
NPR

Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

Turns out, the history of Kraft's dull-orange cheese spread says a lot about the processed food industry — and where it might be headed as Kraft and Heinz merge.
NPR

Proposed Payday Industry Regulations Must Strike Delicate Balance

The federal government is moving to reign in the payday loan industry, which critics say traps consumers in a damaging cycle of debt. A look at the possible effects of proposed regulations.
NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.