WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

NASA Launches Suborbital Sounding Rockets

Play associated audio

NASA launched the first of two suborbital sounding rockets from the Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore earlier this morning. The first rocket splashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 66 miles off the coast, as the 875 pound payload was recovered by NASA officials for re-use and analysis after a successful suborbital research flight.

Saturday's launch will be even bigger, as the 65 foot tall rocket will launch 176 miles above the Earth before landing several hundred miles off the coast.

Sounding rockets are often called research rockets, and can get to areas in the atmosphere that are normally inaccessible to weather balloons and satellites.

In addition, the Wallops Flight Facility announced this week that it plans to develop a $30 million 5 year endeavor that will attempt to send unmanned aircraft into intense hurricanes. The team hopes to learn more about these storms that cause billions of dollars in property damage and impact the lives of millions of coastal residents.

NPR

Cult Survivor Documents 2 Decades Inside 'Holy Hell'

Will Allen directed the documentary Holy Hell, which depicts his experience as a videographer and member of The Buddhafield cult. Allen used his own footage, as well as his interviews with other former members, to make this documentary.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
NPR

GOP Congressman Defends House Zika Funding Package

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about why the House funding package is enough for now to confront the spread of the Zika virus in the U.S.
NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.