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NASA Launches Suborbital Sounding Rockets

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NASA launched the first of two suborbital sounding rockets from the Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore earlier this morning. The first rocket splashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 66 miles off the coast, as the 875 pound payload was recovered by NASA officials for re-use and analysis after a successful suborbital research flight.

Saturday's launch will be even bigger, as the 65 foot tall rocket will launch 176 miles above the Earth before landing several hundred miles off the coast.

Sounding rockets are often called research rockets, and can get to areas in the atmosphere that are normally inaccessible to weather balloons and satellites.

In addition, the Wallops Flight Facility announced this week that it plans to develop a $30 million 5 year endeavor that will attempt to send unmanned aircraft into intense hurricanes. The team hopes to learn more about these storms that cause billions of dollars in property damage and impact the lives of millions of coastal residents.

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'Who Am I Without My Sport?' Greg Louganis On Life After Olympics

The documentary Back On Board traces the highs and lows of the star diver's career, the turmoil he faced as a gay, HIV-positive athlete — and the identity crisis that he experienced after retirement.
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Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.
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As First Presidential Debate Looms, A Look At The Landscape Of The Race

The first debate of the 2016 presidential campaign season is Thursday, Aug. 6. With so many Republican candidates trying to get on stage, what should voters be looking for?
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An App Tells Painful Stories Of Slaves At Monticello's Mulberry Row

A new app uses geolocation to bring to life a lesser-known section of Thomas Jefferson's Virginia estate — Mulberry Row, which was the bustling enclave of skilled slaves who worked at Monticello.

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