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NASA Launches Suborbital Sounding Rockets

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NASA launched the first of two suborbital sounding rockets from the Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore earlier this morning. The first rocket splashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 66 miles off the coast, as the 875 pound payload was recovered by NASA officials for re-use and analysis after a successful suborbital research flight.

Saturday's launch will be even bigger, as the 65 foot tall rocket will launch 176 miles above the Earth before landing several hundred miles off the coast.

Sounding rockets are often called research rockets, and can get to areas in the atmosphere that are normally inaccessible to weather balloons and satellites.

In addition, the Wallops Flight Facility announced this week that it plans to develop a $30 million 5 year endeavor that will attempt to send unmanned aircraft into intense hurricanes. The team hopes to learn more about these storms that cause billions of dollars in property damage and impact the lives of millions of coastal residents.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
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World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


What Information Do Intelligence Agencies Need To Keep U.S. Safe?

In the aftermath of the deadly terrorist attacks in Paris, NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Bruce Hoffman of Georgetown University about what information intelligence agencies need to keep the U.S. safe.

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