Woman Who Ruined Fresco Of Jesus Now Wants To Be Paid | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Woman Who Ruined Fresco Of Jesus Now Wants To Be Paid

Cecilia Giménez, the Spanish woman who really messed up when she tried to restore a 19th-century fresco of Jesus, now wants a piece of the action from the 2,000 or so euros ($2,600) her church has collected from tourists coming to see the ruined artwork.

Spain's El Correo reports, according to Gawker's translation, that the 80+-year-old Giménez has hired lawyers to make her case. A court battle is expected. Ars Technica says the church has also lawyered up.

As Eyder wrote last month, by the time Giménez was done with her attempt at restoration, the image was being likened to a werewolf. But news reports in recent weeks also showed that her work has some fans — such as the online Beast-Jesus Restoration Society — and that it is drawing tourists to the Santuario de Misericordia church in Borja.

So now, it appears, we're at the stage of the story where the inevitable legal actions begin.

Which raises a question:

(Note: That's just a question, not a scientific survey. We'll keep it open until midnight Friday.)
Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Local Theaters Put 'The Interview' On The Marquee

A handful of theaters nationwide decided to show Sony's "The Interview," and there were several in the D.C. area.

NPR

Why Bury Fig Trees? A Curious Tradition Preserves A Taste Of Italy

For generations, Italian-American fig growers in the Northeast have buried their trees in trenches for the winter. It's a tradition that preserves both flavor and ancestral ties to southern Italy.
NPR

Most Federal Workers Get Day After Christmas Off

Thanks to an executive order signed by President Obama, most federal workers are also off on Friday. The cost for the extra day off is $660 million.
NPR

Sony Hack Highlights The Global Underground Market For Malware

The software used in the Sony data breach is available on the underground market. This makes it easier for criminals to execute an attack but harder to identify the perpetrators.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.