No Explanation Yet For Morning Power Problems On Red Line | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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No Explanation Yet For Morning Power Problems On Red Line

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Emergency vehicles cluster outside the Tenleytown Metro station after reports that a train lost power underground Wednesday, Sept. 19. 
Rebecca Cooper
Emergency vehicles cluster outside the Tenleytown Metro station after reports that a train lost power underground Wednesday, Sept. 19. 

There were major delays on Metro's Red Line this morning due to power problems near the NoMa-Gallaudet U station and the Tenleytown station, reports WMATA.

About 60 passengers were evacuated from a train between the NoMA-Gallaudet U and Rhode Island Avenue stations just before 8 a.m. And then on the other side of the Red Line, a train with about 800 passengers was stopped underground near the Tenleytown station for nearly an hour, before being moved into the station and offloading passengers shortly after nearly an hour at 10 a.m.

"People were freaking out and crying," said one passenger, who asked to remain anonymous. "One guy, he went crazy and was going to attack."

Service has returned to normal and Metro is looking into the cause of the problem.

"We do not yet know the cause of aither of these incidents or even if they are related," says Metro spokesperson Dan Stessel.

Riders were facing significant delays in both directions, and the agency recommended passengers use the Green Line between Chinatown/Gallery Place and Fort Totten.

Trains were single tracking between the NoMa and Rhode Island Avenue stations and between Friendship Heights and Tenleytown, but normal service has resumed with some residual delays. Trains are moving at slower speeds while the power problems are investigated.

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