WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Court Rules UVA Doesn't Have To Turn Over Climate Scientist's Emails

Play associated audio
The University of Virginia stood behind one of their former climate scientists, Michael Mann, protecting his emails in court.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/brilestakespictures/6644666263/
The University of Virginia stood behind one of their former climate scientists, Michael Mann, protecting his emails in court.

A judge has ruled that the University of Virginia does not have to turn over emails from a former climate scientist there.

Michael Mann was a climate scientist at UVA, and is one of the big names in climate change research. Conservative groups and politicians who reject the idea that humans are causing climate change have targeted him, accusing him of fraud and demanding he turn over emails discussing his research.

Virginia's attorney general Ken Cuccinelli famously failed in his attempt to investigate the scientist, and now, so has the American Tradition Institute. That organization tried to use Virginia's Freedom of Information Act to force the University to hand over thousands of emails, but a judge has ruled that the professor's emails are exempt.

UVA spokeswoman Carol Wood says the university is pleased that its position protecting scholarly and scientific records was affirmed. Mann, who now works at Penn State, says he is gratified by UVA's efforts.

ATI said on its website that it was "troubled'' by the ruling.

NPR

'Deadpool' Is a Potty-Mouthed Splatterfest. A Really Funny One

NPR film critic Bob Mondello says Deadpool goes in deep on its R rating — and has plenty of fun doing it.
NPR

Buy Crop Insurance, Double Your Money

The nation's crop insurance program is really a lottery, says one economist. And it's rigged so that farmers win. In fact, farmers typically get back double the money they pay for premiums.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - February 12, 2016

D.C. Council Member Yvette Alexander (D-Ward 7) joins Kojo and Tom Sherwood to chat about her upcoming fight for re-election.

NPR

Do You Like Me? Swiping Leads To Spike In Online Dating For Young Adults

A study by the Pew Research Center finds the use of online dating sites has mushroomed in the past few years, particularly among 18- to 24-year-olds.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.