WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Mendelson Takes Reins As D.C. Council Chairman

Play associated audio
Phil Mendelson will take over for Kwame Brown as acting chairman of the D.C. Council.
Mallory Noe-Payne
Phil Mendelson will take over for Kwame Brown as acting chairman of the D.C. Council.

The D.C. Council returns this week with a new head, in acting Chairman Phil Mendelson, who took over when Kwame Brown resigned this summer.

In his first briefing with the media as interim council chairman, Mendelson said he wants to be known as an "effective" leader. He says he hopes lift up the council's dismal approval rating — which has taken a nosedive in recent months because of a series of scandals that forced two council members to resign and plead guilty to various crimes.

But in terms of reforming ethics at the council, Mendelson said it's going to take more than "grand gestures." He has says passing sweeping ethics reform, which the council did earlier this year in response to the scandals, does not make the council ethical. He says trust must will be built up incrementally.

As for campaign finance reform, he says he expects the council to pass some sort of comprehensive bill.

Mendelson is running in a special election to serve out the term.

NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
WAMU 88.5

Why Local Nonprofits Haven't Fixed Poverty

As long as there has been poverty, there have been people trying to end it. We explore the obstacles and inefficiencies local nonprofits run into when trying to solve society's stubborn problem.

WAMU 88.5

Can We Trust Our Cars?

There were more airbag recalls this week, and VW has agreed to pay nearly fifteen billion in its emissions cheating scandal. Meanwhile, cars with driverless technology are becoming available, but whether they will make us safer is up for debate. A look at auto safety and consumer trust.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.