WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Anxiety Abounds For National Zoo's New Panda Cub

Mei Xiang's baby spotted several times on video

Play associated audio
Mother panda Mei Xiang with Tai Shan, her first surviving cub, born in 2005. Only a few glimpses of her new cub have been spotted so far.
Jessie Cohen/Smithsonian's National Zoo
Mother panda Mei Xiang with Tai Shan, her first surviving cub, born in 2005. Only a few glimpses of her new cub have been spotted so far.

The birth of a panda cub this week at National Zoo was cause for celebration, but now nail-biting has begun.

Panda cubs are born hairless and helpless, about the size of a stick of butter. The tiny cubs are at risk for infections and so small that it's not unheard of for panda moms to accidentally crush their young, according to the Associated Press.

For the National Zoo, which has only had one panda cub survive, the memories of past tragedies are real.

Zoo officials are watching panda mom Mei Xiang and her cub via video camera around the clock, and have so far spotted it just a handful of times. It will be a few weeks before they can get in and examine the cub, and you can expect that the newborn will not make it's public debut for several months.

Every week that passes, zoo officials say they will breathe a little easier.

NPR

At 75, Wonder Woman Lassos In A New Generation With An Ageless Fight

As the launch of the upcoming film coincides with the heroine's Comic-Con fandom, Wonder Woman appears to be hooking new fans for the same reasons she was birthed in 1941: justice, peace and feminism.
NPR

For Japanese Parents, Gorgeous Bento Lunches Are Packed With High Stakes

It's cute ... but is it too much cultural pressure?
NPR

Green Party's Jill Stein Wants To Be 'Plan B' For Bernie Sanders Supporters

"I will feel horrible if Donald Trump is elected, I will feel horrible if Hillary Clinton is elected," says Green Party candidate Jill Stein. She says the two big parties lock out other voices.
NPR

Experimental Plane Sets Off On Final Leg Of Its Round-The-World Journey

It's the first time for a solar-powered plane to circumnavigate the globe. Now it's en route to Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates — and you can watch the journey in a live video from the cockpit.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.