Vandalism Targeted Toward LGBT Magazine | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Vandalism Targeted Toward LGBT Magazine

Play associated audio

Some readers of Metro Weekly, a news magazine serving the District's LGBT community, have found feces and rotting food in the news box stands around the city.

Sean Bugg, co-publisher of the magazine, says this has been happening for the past 2 to 3 months.

"It's a hate crime toward my readers because the people who are really getting affected by this are the people who are just going to open a newspaper box," he says. "And someone is trying to harass and, frankly, with the substances that they're putting in the boxes, traumatize them."

Bugg says the weekly vandalisms are happening around Dupont and Logan Circle, which have strong LGBT communities. He says it's not uncommon for publications like his to be targeted.

"Generally it's limited to things like throwing away publications," says Bugg. "This is something at a completely different level. I've never seen this kind of activity directed at a gay and lesbian publication in D.C."

Bugg says the incidents have been reported to the Metropolitan Police Department's Gay and Lesbian Liaison Unit.

NPR

For The Midterm Elections, A Book On 'What It Takes' To Win

The midterm elections are less than two weeks away. Writer Michael Schaub recommends a book that explores what it's like to run for office and live through all the dramatic ups and downs.
NPR

A Wisecracking Biochemist Shares Her Kitchen ABCs

Shirley Corriher, author of Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking, has tips on taking the bitter bite out of coffee, and holding onto cabbage's red hue while it's in the pan.
NPR

For The Midterm Elections, A Book On 'What It Takes' To Win

The midterm elections are less than two weeks away. Writer Michael Schaub recommends a book that explores what it's like to run for office and live through all the dramatic ups and downs.
NPR

New Facebook App A Throwback To Old Chatrooms

Facebook's new app, Rooms, harkens back to the days of 1990s anonymous chat rooms. New York Times tech reporter, Mike Isaac, talks about why having secret identities online is a good thing.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.