Analysis: Controversy Arises Over Missing D.C. Campaign Funds, Virginia Votes On Abortion Clinic Regulations | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Analysis: Controversy Arises Over Missing D.C. Campaign Funds, Virginia Votes On Abortion Clinic Regulations

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Another fundraising controversy arises in the District, abortion clinic regulations spur debate in Virginia, and a Congressional candidate in Maryland drops out. Washington Post columnist Robert McCartney joins WAMU 88.5 Morning Edition host Matt McCleskey to talk about this week's top stories. Following are highlights of their conversation.

McCartney on Council member Michael Brown's missing campaign funds and what this means for him: "It's obviously bad news for Michael Brown. We've known since June that the money was missing, but we didn't know how much. On Monday, Brown issued a statement saying the total that was gone was almost $114,000 on what he called 'unexplained expenditures.' We also learned that that left his campaign with only $18,000. Brown's been saying that the money has been embezzled, and he hinted that it was done by his former campaign treasurer whom he fired in June. A lawyer for the campaign treasurer issued a very strong statement Wednesday defending his client and suggesting that Brown is the one who is at fault."

On the Virginia Board of Health's meeting today to vote on new abortion clinic regulations: "This meeting today could be quite raucous. Both abortion opponents and supporters of abortion rights are bringing their activists to the session. It's an important showdown. Cuccinelli and to a lesser extent Gov. Bob McDonnell are trying to force the Board of Health to reverse itself on a ruling from June, and adopt a stronger position against abortion. Both have supported a law to tighten building regulations on abortion clinics... to raise the pressure a bit this week, Cuccinelli warned the Board of Health if they disregard his legal advice, then the state won't necessarily pay their legal defense fees if they get sued."

On the Maryland Democratic congressional candidate that dropped out of the race after news surfaced that she had voted in two different states in the same election: "It certainly benefits the incumbent Andy Harris, but he was probably going to win anyway. Harris' district was the one Republican district in the state that actually became more Republican when the lines were redrawn after the 2010 Census. Rosen was forced to withdraw by her own party. The Democrats found out from a tipster that she voted in both Maryland and Florida in both 2006 and 2008. They confronted her, and she agreed to step down."

Listen to the full analysis here.

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