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Archives To Display 'Fifth Page' Of Constitution For First Time

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The first four pages of the Constitution are on permenant display at the National Archives.
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The first four pages of the Constitution are on permenant display at the National Archives.

The National Archives is displaying the so-called "fifth page" of the U.S. Constitution for the first time this weekend.

The fifth page of the Constitution is known as the transmittal page. It's signed by George Washington, and describes how the Constitution was to be ratified and put into effect. The Archives says the extra page will be on display in the East Rotunda Gallery from tomorrow through Monday, also known as Constitution Day.

The other four pages of the Constitution are on permanent display at the Archives, along with the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence.

Also on Monday, the Archives will continue its tradition of holding a naturalization ceremony on Constitution Day. This year, 225 petitioners will take part to mark the Constitution's 225th anniversary. The Archives will open to the public following that ceremony.

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