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Virginia Loses Some Funding For Chesapeake Restoration

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Virginia's approach to curbing runoff has cost them federal cleanup funding.
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Virginia's approach to curbing runoff has cost them federal cleanup funding.

Virginia will lose some federal funding for Chesapeake Bay restoration projects this year, the Virginian-Pilot reports. 

The Environmental Protection Agency notified the state late last month that it is withholding $1.2 million in grant money, according to an email obtained by the Norfolk-based newspaper. Virginia was supposed to receive more than $2.4 million dollars this year.

The EPA cited Virginia's lack of progress in reducing stormwater runoff from city streets, parking lots and urban storm drains. Agency officials say if Virginia makes improvements, it can reapply for the funding.

In July, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation praised Virginia's efforts at addressing water pollution, but echoed the findings of the EPA, citing runoff in particular as a structural weakness of the commonwealth's approach.

Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation spokesman Gary Waugh told the Virginian-Pilot the state has been working to improve its stormwater program.

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