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Let Sleepless Babies Cry (For A While), If They Want To

When cranky babies won't sleep, is it OK to let them cry it out?

The short answer: Yes, within limits.

Many parents these days try to help their babies learn to sleep better by letting them cry a little.

One approach, sometimes called "Ferberizing" after the pediatrician who has popularized it, involves parents gradually lengthening how long they let their babies cry before soothing them. The other is sometimes called "camping out" and involves moving further away from the crib a night at a time until baby can get to sleep on her own.

These techniques, which were shown helpful for kids and their moms in an Australian study, don't appear to scar kids. The researchers evaluated the children who had been part of the original study five years later.

At age 6, there was no evidence of harm or, it must be said, long-term benefit for those kids whose parents used the sleep techniques.

Therefore, the researchers concluded, "parent can feel confident using, and health professionals can feel confident offering behavioral techniques such as controlled comforting and camping out for managing infant sleep."

The findings appear in the latest issue of Pediatrics. For more advice see HealthChildren.org, a website for parents from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Cult Survivor Documents 2 Decades Inside 'Holy Hell'

Will Allen directed the documentary Holy Hell, which depicts his experience as a videographer and member of The Buddhafield cult. Allen used his own footage, as well as his interviews with other former members, to make this documentary.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Donald Trump now has enough delegates to clinch the Republican nomination, according to the Associated Press. A State Department review criticizes Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server. And 11 states sue the federal government over a transgender bathroom directive. A panel of journalists joins guest host Sabri Ben-Achour for analysis of the week's top national news stories

NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

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