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Capitol Bomb Plotter Promised 'Martyrdom Payments'

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The alleged plot to blow up the U.S. Capitol included promises of payments to the family of the accused.
Mylon Medley
The alleged plot to blow up the U.S. Capitol included promises of payments to the family of the accused.

An FBI sting operation promised payments of up to $1,000 a month to a Moroccan immigrant who eventually volunteered to kill himself in a plot to bomb the U.S. Capitol.

Twenty-nine-year-old Amine El-Khalifi, who was living in Alexandria until the time of his arrest in February, will be sentenced in federal court on Friday, according to the Associated Press.

In court papers, El-Khalifi's lawyers say their client received more than $5,700 in living expenses from undercover FBI agents during the six-month investigation. El-Khalifi's was also promised his parents would receive what the lawyers describe as "martyrdom payments'' of up to $1,000 a month after he completed the attack.

El Khalifi allegedly volunteered to wear a suicide vest and kill himself in an operation at the U.S. Capitol.

The plea deal requires a minimum sentence of at least 25 years.

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