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DeMatha Football Players Accused Of Hiring Sex Workers After Away Game

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A nationally ranked high school football program in Maryland has lost several of its players over a prostitution scandal. Five underage football players who attend DeMatha catholic high school in Hyattsville, Md. are alleged to have hired prostitutes and and some of the athletes may have engaged in sex with the women, the Washington Post reports.

The Post reported that it confirmed the incident with the parent of one of the players involved and other individual. The incident is alleged to have happened this past Saturday after the team travelled to North Carolina for a Friday night game. 

The 65-member team was chaperoned by 18 adults who monitored the hotel rooms until 1:30 a.m. and the halls until 4:30 a.m. The players are said to have snuck the sex workers into their rooms at 5 a.m. 

The private Catholic school's principal and football coach declined to comment to the Post, and in a press release, the school would only say that five players face disciplinary actions. 

Two players have withdrawn, two face expulsion and a fifth faces a disciplinary hearing, according to the Post.

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