Ellicott City Derailment Caused $2.2M In Damage | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Ellicott City Derailment Caused $2.2M In Damage

An official walks past part of a CSX freight trail that derailed overnight in Ellicott City, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 21.
(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
An official walks past part of a CSX freight trail that derailed overnight in Ellicott City, Md., Tuesday, Aug. 21.

Transportation officials say the train derailment in Ellicott City, Md., last month that resulted in the death of two young women also caused $2.2 million in damage.

The National Transportation Safety Board, which is investigating the accident, released a preliminary one-page report Wednesday. The report does not state a cause of the accident that occurred just before midnight, Aug. 20, and largely confirms what investigators had already said.

The train, which was carrying coal, was traveling at the authorized speed of 25 mph when it derailed in Ellicott City. The two young women who died were sitting on a railroad bridge at the time of the derailment and were buried in coal.

The probable cause of the accident will be determined after a full investigation to be finished in 12 to 18 months.

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