WAMU 88.5 : News

DNC 2012 Roundup: Michelle Obama Rallies Crowd

The Democratic National Convention officially got underway Tuesday, with first lady Michelle Obama culminating a night of speeches that also included Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley and San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro.

Michelle Obama worked to portray her husband as someone who identifies with the middle class and she teared up in a couple of instances as she talked about their family. She also brought the crowd to tears a couple of times, including with the line: “Being president doesn’t change who you are; being president reveals who you are.” 

Castro, who has been enduring comparisons between himself and President Obama since he was announced as a DNC speaker, told his story of growing up as an immigrant in Texas and criticized Mitt Romney. (His 3-year-old daughter also got a moment in the limelight when a camera panned to her and she adorably flipped her hair a few times on TV.) 

Democrats on the first day of the convention touched on a variety of issues:




In WAMU 88.5’s coverage of the conventions: 


Elsewhere around the convention: 

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